More Good News: Trump may soon withdraw troops from Afghanistan

Just after President Trump recently announced plans to withdraw troops from Syria, he reportedly is also considering plans to withdraw troops from Afghanistan, where the U.S. has roughly 14,000 soldiers deployed.

Make no mistake, this is wonderful news. The U.S. has maintained military a presence in the country since 2001 (not to mention the indirect involvement in the 80s when we funded the Mujahideen in their fight against the Soviets). Since 2001, we have lost an estimated 2,400 soldiers, and spent over $900 Billion.

And what have we gained? Well, we successfully killed Osama bin Laden, the mastermind behind the 9/11 attacks, no doubt a success, and the original purpose of the mission. Beyond that, however, we cannot say much. We haven’t eliminated the Taliban, nor have we eliminated terror threats. We must be honest with ourselves, if we believe military intervention will eventually eradicate potential terror threats to the US, we will find ourselves in the Middle East and Africa for a long time.

This is to say, we should withdraw immediately. The presence of our troops in the Middle East, as well as the bombings and airstrikes undertaken by the US military, do little good and produce further antagonism amongst the local population. Military involvement in the Middle East undoubtedly leads to the antagonized to respond with attacks against foreign countries, as France learned in 2015. Try to understand the perspective of people who become radicalized as a result of our military intervention: our military that continues to kill civilians in “targeted” airstrikes, bombings, etc., persists in someone’s home country. Perhaps theses locals should understand that we have “just” motives, but we certainly cannot expect all to accept such motives. The point is not to ask whether such responses, is just on their part. The point is to say that such reactions are a reality that we must incorporate into our foreign policy decisions.

As far as our apparent goal in these interventions, we cannot say for sure how we can mitigate terrorism’s causes, since we do not clearly know them. One thing is certain, military intervention does little to mitigate it, so we should leave Afghanistan immediately. We can only hope the president continues to defy his “advisors” and follows through on this.

Advertisements

28 thoughts on “More Good News: Trump may soon withdraw troops from Afghanistan

  1. By pulling out completely, all you’d be doing is guarantee the various jihadi groups a safe haven again. Eventually, they would strike at the US and other western countries. What’s going on with the jihadis is not just about foreign presences in the ME, it also revolves around the basic culture clash between parts of Islam and the West. Plus, are you prepared to accept the moral consequences of leaving the large numbers of Afghans who supported the US led COALITION to the tender mercies of the Taliban, particularly the women? And in the aftermath of the Taliban retaking power, are you willing to accept two or three hundred thousand Afghan refugees? Finally, in important places like Beijing and Moscow, a complete Afghan pull out by the USA could be viewed as a Vietnam style bug out (Yes, some people outside the US view our defeat in Vietnam as a result of a lack of willpower, and inside the US, some people, me included, never bought the “unwindable war” story), which could cause leaders in either country to try to tempt fate in Europe or Asia. Great power politics is based almost entirely on strength and will. The world is not a bus, you cannot get off it any time you feel like it.

    Google the Time Magazine Afghan girl photograph, and then think things over.

    Like

    1. Thank you for your comment. I agree. Our withdrawal will allow the return of groups like the Taliban, as well as possibly terrorist organizations. I do, however, disagree that it is at all likely that they will attack us. After all, we only have ever been attacked after we involved ourselves militarily in the Middle East. I cannot say for certain, but it seems to me that little to no countries who have not been involved in the Middle East have been attacked by terrorists.
      I agree there are cultural clashes between the West and the Middle East (as well as the Middle East and East Asia I would say). I do not think we can force a shift in culture views. Cultures only ever change incrementally, and usually only change when left alone.
      I fully understand the moral consequences of withdrawal. However, I have a few points. One, the countries we involve ourselves in are not the only ones who violate moral values we hold to be true. Yet we do not involve ourselves in these other countries. Two, as I mentioned earlier, we cannot cause a shift in the views of culture vastly different then our own. If we cannot cause such a shift, then we will be there forever, and countless more soldiers will die, as well as the innocent civilians that are caught in the crossfire. Yes, a withdrawal may increase incoming refugees, but that is likely a smaller cost then keeping a presence over there.
      I suppose we disagree on how winnable both Viet nam was and Afghanistan is. I will not speak to Vietnam since that time has past, but our time spent in Afghanistan (as well as the failures of prior empires that sought to control Afghanistan) should suggest the unlikelihood that we will ever achieve victory. I believe that we should not persist in unwinnable wars just to maintain a reputation with foreign powers. Lives are at stake here.
      I have a problem with surmising about possible actions of foreign powers. People believed that the fall of Vietnam would lead to the infamous domino effect…which never happened. While I empathize with the women of Afghanistan, and with all of your arguments, I do not think our foreign policy should operate on baseless assumptions.

      Like

  2. I’m not sure what the right policy is, but it is faulty logic to conclude we achieved nothing. While we have been there, Al Qaeda has been denied the safe haven it had before we went in. More recently, ISIS has been denied the same thing. So, we may very well have achieved something, even if it is not a permanent success.

    Like

    1. Thank you for your comment. Yes, both of these organizations have been denied safe haven, but only while we stay there. We can never guarantee that these same organizations, or organizations like them, will not come back as soon as we leave. Does that mean we should stay forever? I don’t think we should. I think that if we remove all involvement in the Middle East and Africa, we will remove the likelihood that such groups will want to attack us. After all, it seems (for the most part at least) like the only countries that get attacked by terrorists are those who involve themselves in the Middle East and Africa.

      Like

  3. If we leave, there will be a terrorist safe haven? LOL. There is one right next store in Pakistan. Hell, the terrorist group LeT (of Mumbai Massacre fame) is state-sponsored by the Pakistani government. There are terrorist havens in Somalia, Yemen, Sudan, Libya, southern Phillipines, etc. but haven’t tried to nation build in those places. No, it’s time to leave Afghanistan. If we can’t fix the gang problem in Chicago, we don’t have the aptitude to solve Afghanistan.

    Like

  4. The correct answer is to withdraw but reinstall the absolute monarchy – no elections – then hold Kabul only with airlifts and tactical thermonuclear weapons. The population of Kabul – harem and the monarchy apart – should be non-Muslim and preferably, non-Afghan.

    We would keep the UN seat, the central bank, the passport issuance, the conduct of foreign relations.

    We’d bomb any alternative capital.

    Let the crazies have their goats. We’ll keep international personality.
    That’s all we need to deny them a sovereign base.

    Like

  5. When someone writes an piece of writing he/she maintains the plan of a user in his/her mind that how a user can understand it.
    So that’s why this piece of writing is amazing.
    Thanks!

    Like

  6. Hi, Neat post. There’s a problem together with your website in web explorer, may check this?
    IE nonetheless is the market leader and a large section of other folks will leave out your magnificent writing due to this problem.

    Like

  7. Do you have a spam issue on this site; I also am a blogger, and I was wondering your situation; we have developed some nice procedures and we are looking to swap strategies with
    others, please shoot me an email if interested.

    Like

  8. Oh my goodness! Incredible article dude! Thank you
    so much, However I am encountering difficulties with your RSS.
    I don’t understand the reason why I cannot join it.
    Is there anyone else getting similar RSS issues? Anybody who knows the solution can you kindly respond?
    Thanks!!

    Like

  9. My programmer is trying to convince me to move to .net from PHP.

    I have always disliked the idea because of
    the expenses. But he’s tryiong none the less. I’ve
    been using Movable-type on a number of websites for about a year and am concerned about switching to another
    platform. I have heard great things about blogengine.net.
    Is there a way I can import all my wordpress content into it?
    Any help would be really appreciated!

    Like

  10. It is the best time to make some plans for the future and it is time to be happy.
    I’ve read this post and if I could I desire to suggest you few interesting things or tips.

    Maybe you could write next articles referring to this article.
    I want to read more things about it!

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s